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Paula's Poetry Page

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Module 4: Poetry Break 18

A Poem Relevant to Science

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Introduction:  This is the perfect poem to introduce the children to the senses.  Lead the students in a discussion on the five senses.  Have them list all of the things they can detect in the classroom using their senses.  Ask questions for each of the senses to elicit a variety of responses.
 
"The Senseless Lab of Professor Revere" by Jon Scieszka
 
Listen, my children, and you shall hear,
Of how loud noises go in your ear.
 
And look, my youngsters, bright lights will be
The way you figure out how you see.
 
And feel, my students.  Is that too much?
With gopher guts, you learn about touch.
 
And chew, my kiddies. Oh, what a waste.
That frog-eye stew was for you to taste.
 
And sniff, my scientists.  Ain't it just swell
How ten-year-old cheese demonstrates smell?
 
So those are your senses.  Class is done.
Next week--diseases! Won't that be fun?
 
Taken from:
 
Scieszka, Jon. 2004. SCIENCE VERSE. Illustrated by: Lane Smith. New York: Viking. ISBN: 0670910570.
 
Extension:  Students can use their senses by playing the mystery bag game. Place a variety of objects that have a distinct texture or scent inside a brown paper bag.  Invite the children to feel, smell, listen to and even taste (with teacher permission) to determine what is in the bag.
 
Discuss a five senses poem with the students and that each line describes the topic as it appeals to one of the senses.  Have them select their favorite food, season, color, etc. and brainstorm any ideas that their choice evokes regarding the senses.
 
I see ________________________________.
I hear _______________________________.
I feel ________________________________.
I smell _______________________________.
I taste _______________________________.
 
An excellent nonfiction book to accompany this poem is:
 
Ziefert, Harriet. 2002. YOU CAN'T TASTE A PICKLE WITH YOUR EAR. Illustrated by: Amanda Haley. Brooklyn: Blue Apple Books. ISBN: 1929766688.
 
This book is an introduction to the five senses and is packed with humor and factual information for students to enjoy with their fingers, ears, nose, but not their mouth!
 

This web site was created as an assignment for LS 5903 - Section 23 at TWU.
 
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Book covers on this site taken from Google Images and Follett Library Resources.